Nurses, Nursing RN Program and Nursing Education

 

Our nurses are partners in the multidisciplinary care teams that form around each child we treat. People come from across the country and beyond to enjoy our working environment. We are a regional referral center for children, providing care in a multitude of subspecialties. As a result, we receive patients with a wider variety of health disorders than most community hospitals.

Areas of Speciality

Children's Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) offers nurses and RNs the opportunity to specialize in several critical care areas.

  • Cardiovascular Care Nursing
  • Critical Care Nursing
  • Hematology-Oncology Nursing
  • Medical Services Nursing
  • Rehabilitation Nursing
  • Neonatal Intensive Care Nursing (NICCU)
  • Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) Nursing
  • Post-Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) Nursing
  • Surgical Nursing

Cardiovascular Nursing Care

The Heart Institute at CHLA is known as an international leader in the treatment of heart disease and lung disorders in children. It is the largest pediatric cardiovascular center in the West, and serves as a global referral center. We provide virtually every advanced treatment for heart disorders and defects affecting children. 

Cardiovascular Acute Unit

The Helen and Max Rosenthal Cardiovascular Acute Care Unit is a 21-bed unit. Nurses on this unit provide care for patients who are awaiting transplants and need intensive monitoring during this process. 

Cardiovascular Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Unit (CTICU)

The 24-bed Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Unit, staffed by pediatric intensivists and located in the Heart Institute, is the only dedicated, separately-staffed unit for pediatric patients on the West Coast. About 900 patients are admitted each year, including children with the most complex diseases of the heart and lung.

Child Abuse and Neglect

The Audrey Hepburn CARES team provides comprehensive medical and mental health services to children in who are suspected victims of child maltreatment, including sexual and physical abuse, neglect and HIV infection.

Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Unit (CTICU)

The 24-bed Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Unit, staffed by pediatric intensivists and located in the Heart Institute, is the only dedicated, separately-staffed unit for pediatric patients on the West Coast. About 900 patients are admitted each year, including children with the most complex diseases of the heart and lung.

ECMO (Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation)

CHLA has one of the most active and productive Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) programs in the United States, providing long-term cardiac and pulmonary bypass support for infants and children who are in life-threatening cardiac or cardio-respiratory failure in the PICU, the CTICU and Center for Newborn and Infant Critical Care.

Emergency Department (ED)

The Emergency Department at CHLA cares for more than 66,000 infants, children and adolescents each year. Half of these children are managed through our Kids Care, or urgent care unit. The other half are often treated for severe illness or critical injury in our Emergency Department. The Department manages more than 25 percent of all pediatric emergency cases in Los Angeles County.

Emergency Transport

CHLA is home to a dedicated Emergency Transport Program that serves as a regional resource for children suffering from life-threatening illness or injuries who need very specialized medical care. When our transport team arrives at remote sites, they are bringing with them the cutting-edge intensive care capabilities provided at CHLA.

Newborn and Infant Critical Care Unit (NICCU)

The 58-bed Newborn and Infant Critical Care Unit provides innovative therapies for critically ill newborns and extremely low birthweight infants requiring Level III neonatal care, transferred from other hospitals to CHLA. In addition to providing ECMO, the tertiary care provided, includes nitric oxide and high frequency ventilation.

Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU)

PICU Nurses Group PhotoThe 24-bed Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, is the largest such unit on the West Coast, providing care for trauma cases, critical medical cases and post-operative surgical patients from all subspecialties. Nearly 1,400 critically ill patients – too sick to be treated on general inpatient floors – are admitted each year for specialized medical and nursing services.

Because of our diverse patient population, we are well-versed in an array of pathophysiology and nursing management issues. The technologies used in the unit include non-conventional ventilation, nurse-run hemofiltration and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO).

Our nurses are required to obtain pediatric advanced life support (PALS) certification and Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses (APHON) certification in chemotherapy and biotherapy within the first year of hire. They are also encouraged to receive certification in critical care nursing (CCRN) within the first three years of employment at Children's Hospital Los Angeles.

Trauma

CHLA is the only freestanding Level 1 Pediatric Trauma Center in Los Angeles County approved by the County Department of Health Services and accredited by the American College of Surgeons. We treat more than 1,100 pediatric trauma patients annually.

Our Children's Center for Cancer and Blood Diseases is one of the nation’s largest pediatric hematology/oncology programs.

The Center sees nearly 1,200 newly diagnosed patients and patients seeking second opinions annually, and the Center’s outpatient clinic sees nearly 25,000 visits a year.

Bone Marrow Transplant

The 14-bed Bone Marrow Transplant Unit treats a variety of malignant and non-malignant disorders with autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplants, allogeneic related hematopoietic stem cell transplants, allogeneic unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplants and related and unrelated cord blood stem cell transplants. The unit is accredited by the Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy (FACT).

The first bone marrow transplant was performed at Children's Hospital Los Angeles in 1983. More than 1150 hematopoietic stem cell transplants have been performed at the hospital, and approximately 50 to 60 are performed annually.

There are two separate inpatient hematology/oncology units - collectively comprised of approximately 85 percent oncology patients and 15 percent hematology patients, treating children requiring:

  • Diagnostic work to establish a new diagnosis
  • Administration of standard and investigational chemotherapy
  • Treatment of complications of therapy
  • Supportive care
  • End-of-life-care

The most common childhood cancer disorders treated at our hospital include leukemia and central nervous system tumors.  The most common hematological disorders include sickle cell anemia, thalassemia and aplastic anemia.

About Our Care Units

Unit 4 East is for children with leukemia, lymphoma and hematology patients.  Unit 4 West is for children with bone and soft tissue tumors and other solid tumors, central nervous system tumors and step-down hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. 4 East and 4 West have 48 beds in total.

The Outpatient Center’s ambulatory practice accommodates most procedures, including those requiring general anesthesia or conscious sedation. These clinics deliver comprehensive care in hematology, oncology, bone marrow transplant and the Long-term Information Follow-up & Evaluation (LIFE) program. The outpatient area also includes the Hematology/Oncology Day Hospital, radiation oncology, urgent care and a referral service.

5 East

Unit 5 East is a 32-bed unit for:

  • Adolescent medicine   
  • Allergy-immunology 
  • Neurology
  • Hematologic disorders 
  • Genetics   

Common pulmonary disorders treated on 5 East include pneumonia, bronchiolitis, asthma and cystic fibrosis, with complications.

5 West

Unit 5 West is a 32-bed unit for:

  • General pediatrics 
  • Infectious diseases 
  • Pulmonary conditions
  • Rheumatology
  • Diabetes, endocrine and metabolic disorders 

This unit can accommodate up to 15 home ventilator and/or bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP) patients who are stable enough to be outside an intensive care setting. It is the only non-intensive care unit in the hospital managing patients with diabetic ketoacidosis on insulin drips. Common infectious diseases treated on 5 West include tuberculosis, pertussis and Kawasaki disease.

6 East

6 East is a 32-bed unit caring for children who have undergone procedures from the following specialty areas:

  • Ear, Nose and Throat (Otolaryngology)
  • Neurosurgery
  • Orthopaedic Surgery
  • Plastic and Maxillofacial Surgery
  • Urology

6 West

6 West is a 32-bed unit caring for children who have undergone procedures from the following specialty areas:

  • Gastroenterology
  • Nephrology
  • Ophthalmology
  • Pediatric Surgery
  • Solid Organ Transplant (excluding cardiothoracic transplants)

6 North

6 North is a blended, 30-bed, acute medical/surgical and rehabilitation unit. The Division of Rehabilitative Medicine treats children with:

  • Anoxic brain insults
  • Cancer and blood diseases
  • Cystic fibrosis
  • General surgery
  • Head trauma
  • Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Orthopedic
  • Rheumatoid diseases
  • Spinal cord injury

Our Expertise

The staff of the Steven & Alexandra Cohen Foundation Newborn and Infant Critical Care Unit provides care for critically ill newborns and infants that are born at other hospitals and transported to Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. The majority of infants transferred here are in need of immediate medical or surgical intervention. These infants require intensive nursing care.

Some examples of the children we see include:

  • Newborns and infants with surgical emergencies
  • Medical and surgical conditions associated with complications of extreme prematurity
  • Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, requiring complex cardiopulmonary management and possibly extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)
  • Preterm and term neonates with congenital heart disease, often having multiple other congenital anomalies
  • A host of general pediatric surgical and surgical subspecialty conditions affecting newborns

What Makes Our Unit Special

The Level IV, state-of-the-art Cohen Foundation NICCU is a Tertiary Regional Center. It is located in the Marion and John E. Anderson Pavilion, and specifically designed to address the needs of critically ill infants and promote family-centered care. We are actively involved and included by administrators and physicians in making care decisions and process changes on the unit.

Number of Beds, Volumes and Offerings

  • 58 beds in private or semi-private rooms
  • Approximately 600 admissions of critically ill infants annually requiring neonatal medical and surgical subspecialty services, including ECMO and total body cooling
  • March of Dimes Family Support Center

Training and Mentorship Opportunities

  • Specialized nurse training for ECMO and peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) insertion
  • Versant RN Residency Program
  • Annual Neonatal Conference, designed and coordinated by staff nurses

Social and Bonding Events

  • Biennial Neonatal Reunion and Health Fair
  • Annual Winter Holiday Party

Our Team

The Cohen Foundation NICCU has more than 160 registered nurses (RNs). Twenty-five percent of these RNs have an associate degree, 68 percent have a bachelor of science degree and seven percent have a master of science degree. Certifications in the specialties of neonatal nursing and critical care are held by 15 percent of staff members. In addition, we currently have three certified lactation educators on our team and expect to have more in the near future. In addition, our staff is ethnically diverse, speaking many languages and originating from many countries, reflecting our diverse patient population.

We don't just provide care for children. We care about each other. We frequently reach out to each other for personal and professional support. Teamwork is a necessity in this intensive care environment and something you will encounter here on a daily basis.

Interested in joining our team? Take a look at our current job openings.

Meet One of Our NICCU Nurses

Nancy McNeill came to Children's Hospital Los Angeles as a graduate student and was given many learning opportunities. The first day she entered the NICCU, she knew it's where she wanted to be, and she doesn't plan to leave!

Click here to apply for an RN II NICCU position.

Our Accomplishments

The Cohen Foundation NICCU offers some of the latest advances in medicine. We have one of the first and largest ECMO programs in California, and provide an extensive total body cooling/hypothermia program, nitric oxide therapy and neurally-controlled ventilation.

The NICCU is also a designated California Children's Services Regional Center and is affiliated with the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California. The NICCU has grown to a capacity of 58 beds and treats hundreds of infants annually.

A Premier Nursing Environment

Magnet Initiatives

Flexible Scheduling

Although our RN staff members are issued permanent schedules, there is always the flexibility of trading shifts with one another should the need arise. RNs are able to request time off up to six months in advance, allowing them to plan days off and vacations ahead of time. One of the NICCU staff RNs facilitates the scheduling process with manager oversight.

Collaborative Governance

The NICCU has staff representatives on all four collaborative governance councils, including three members on the House of Representatives. Participation in the councils has allowed our staff to be increasingly involved in decision making and implementation of new educational activities. They have also been able to lead change and transformation at the unit level.

Culture of Safety

Providing a culture of safety for our patients and families is a priority in the NICCU. Parents and families register at the reception desk upon arrival to the unit and are directed to their child’s bedside by the unit assistant after proper hand hygiene.

Also, there is only one entrance to the unit to keep our patients, families and staff safe. Parents are encouraged to notify their nurse or a manager of any patient safety issues. Staff education on patient safety is ongoing, with performance improvement projects in process at all times.

Family-Centered Care

Parents of infants are welcome in the unit at all times. One parent may spend the night beside their child during the night, which allows for parent-infant bonding and opportunities for parent education.

March of Dimes Parent Hour is held each month, focusing on a variety of interesting topics. Past topics include craft activities, facilitated by parents of previous NICCU patients; an hour dedicated to the introduction of Music Therapy for Infants, led by our music therapist; and a presentation by one of the NICCU nurses on Infant Massage.

In addition, the NICCU Family Centered Care Committee sponsors NICCUniversity, an hour designated to teaching parents about various topics regarding the NICCU and its environment. Parents are encouraged to participate in their infant’s care, whenever appropriate.

Our Expertise

The Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) at Children's Hospital Los Angeles is a twenty-four bed Level I Trauma Unit. Our PICU cares for the most complex critically ill patients in a family-centered care environment.

  • Because of our diverse patient population, we are well-versed in an array of pathophysiology and nursing management issues. The technologies used in the unit include non-conventional ventilation, nurse-run hemofiltration and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO).
  • Our nurses are required to obtain pediatric advanced life support (PALS) certification and Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses (APHON) certification in chemotherapy and biotherapy within the first year of hire. They are also encouraged to receive certification in critical care nursing (CCRN) within the first three years of employment at Children's Hospital Los Angeles.

What Makes our Unit Special

Professional Opportunities

  • Our nurses present their patients on rounds and participate in developing the plan of care.
  • Clinical mentoring of new staff
  • Active participation in several research studies
  • Multiple opportunities for staff nurse involvement in unit and hospital councils
  • Family Centered Care Committee became the role model for housewide initiatives.
  • Current Job Openings

 

Work Environment

  • The PICU management team has worked together for many years, providing stability and a nurturing atmosphere on the unit. They share a passion for life-long learning and strive to promote a healthy work environment.
  • We offer a challenging and motivating environment, supporting one of the largest Hematology/Oncology programs in the country, as well as a Level I Trauma program.
  • A close relationship among staff, unit leadership and management, and incredible displays of teamwork.

Our Team

The PICU team is comprised of more than 80 nurses whose clinical experience ranges from one to 30 years. We facilitate professional growth through active unit-based councils and advanced courses. Our nurses participate in leading-edge research conducted by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Children’s Hospital Association (CHA).

We also offer:

  • Twenty-four hour attending, fellow, resident and nurse practitioner coverage.
  • A cohesive management team that practices servant leadership, which originates from a desire to serve our staff when their needs matter most.
  • An ECMO-certified team.
  • A unit-based hemofiltration program.

Our Accomplishments

  • Beacon Award for Nursing Excellence from the American Association of Critical Care Nurses, 2009-2010
  • Beacon Award for Nursing Excellence from the American Association of Critical Care Nurses, Silver, 2011-2014
  • Overall Grand Champions of Hospital-wide Disaster Olympics, 2009 and 2010 
  • Decreasing our blood stream infections (BSI) to zero for 418 days, 2009-2010

Magnet Initiatives

  • Flexible scheduling: The PICU has self-scheduling, meaning that the six-week schedule is made by the staff. Our Scheduling Committee then negotiates with staff to help balance staffing numbers for each shift. The PICU management team believes it is very important to help nurses balance their work and home life.
  • Collaborative governance: We have strong, active unit-based committees that direct and provide education, training and guidance for preceptors, as well as boost and support social activities and morale. The PICU unit-based committee chairs serve as our housewide Patient Care Service Council representatives. This committee-council structure keeps our bedside staff nurses involved in governing and running hospital affairs. It also allows for information flow from the bedside to the councils and back.
  • Research: We participate in a number of nursing and physician-led research projects. Many of our research projects are done in collaboration with CHA and the NIH.
  • Flexible scheduling
  • Collaborative governance
  • Research
  • Learn more about our Magnet initiatives.

Children's Hospital Los Angeles PACU nurses are a highly specialized group of nurses dedicated to providing quality, family-centered care to patients who have undergone surgical interventions/procedures under general anesthesia or sedation involving one or more of the following services:

  • Anesthesiology
  • Bone Marrow Transplant
  • Cardiothoracic Surgery/Cardiac Catheterization
  • Dental Surgery
  • Gastroenterology
  • General Pediatric Surgery
  • Neurosurgery
  • Oncology
  • Ophthalmology
  • Orthopaedic Surgery
  • Otolaryngology
  • Plastic Surgery
  • Radiology
  • Urology

 

We care for children of all ages ranging from infants to adults in both our 22-bed main recovery room and our 13-bed ambulatory surgery center recovery room.

PACU Staff

Nursing skill level ranges from novice – including new graduates from the RN Residency Program , to expert clinical nurses able to manage the care of critically ill patients while in PACU.

Surgical Admitting

Our nurses assess healthy, as well as chronically ill and fragile patients, preparing them prior to being cared for by anesthesia and the surgical team for procedures provided by one or more of the surgical specialties.

Operating Room

Nurses who work in the Operating Room of our hospital provide surgical care to children of all ages (neonate to young adult) who are to undergo general anesthesia for operative or invasive procedures. We perform more than 15,500 pediatric surgeries a year, including more complex surgical procedures than any other hospital in Southern California.

The unit consists of 15 state-of-the-art surgical suites (two of which have been upgraded to support the growing field of pediatric minimally invasive surgery) and four on campus Ambulatory Surgery Center suites where, in combination, approximately 16,000 cases are performed annually.

A new da Vinci robot offers our patients an alternative to, not only traditional open surgery, but also the usual laparoscopy technique.  New registered nurses, skilled registered nurses with no operating room experience and trained operating room registered nurses are all welcome in this supportive educational environment.

Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU)

The Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) includes 10 beds. The average length of stay for these patients is four days; this is a fast-moving unit with great emphasis on the fundamentals of pediatric nursing. We care for children of all ages ranging from infants to adults in both our 22-bed main recovery room and our 13-bed ambulatory surgery center recovery room. Nursing skill level ranges from novice – including new graduates to expert clinical nurses able to manage the care of critically ill patients while in PACU.

Surgical and Medical Specialties

6 West is a 32-bed medical-surgical unit. We specialize in renal and liver transplant but also care for children receiving care from the following specialties:

  • General surgery
  • Intestinal rehabilitation
  • Nephrology
  • Gastroenterology
  • Urology

Annual Social Events

  • Moving day celebration
  • Staff Christmas party
  • New Year’s celebration at work
  • 6 West newsletter

All of our staff, including patient care service aides (PCSA), has Basic Life Support (BLS) certification. Our licensed personnel have the following certifications:

  • Certified Pediatric Nurse
  • Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS)
  • Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS)
  • Chemotherapy Administration Certification
  • Transplant

Surgery Facilities

The operating room facilities consists of 15 state-of-the-art surgical suits (two of which have been upgraded to support the growing field of pediatric minimally-invasive surgery) and four on-campus Ambulatory Surgery Center suites. A new da Vinci robot offers our patients an alternative to, not only traditional open surgery, but also to less traditional laparoscopic surgery.

Clinical Services Collaborative Governance

Collaborative Governance is a form of governance that involves staff members in the processes of decision-making and communication. Children’s Hospital Los Angeles is unique in its collaborative governance structure because it involves all disciplines within Clinical Services (CS). This structure facilitates communication and optimizes staff participation in decision making across all disciplines.  Interprofessional collaborative governance brings professional stakeholders to the table to create a team, with a focus on realizing goals, enhancing professionalism, and improving patient care together (Hess, 2017).

  • Our Mission, Vision and Philosophy
  • Our Journey Towards Collaborative Governance
  • Collaborative Governance Structure

Collaborative Governance Mission

To facilitate the provision of quality pediatric patient and family-centered care founded in collaboration, cultural sensitivity and innovation and supported by research and evidence-based practice.

Collaborative Governance Vision

The Clinical Services (CS) Councils guide decision-making processes at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles and facilitate active participation and leadership by direct care staff members.  Council recommendations support the provision of outstanding family-centered care, cultural sensitivity, lifelong learning, collaboration, and evidence-based practice.

Collaborative Governance Philosophy

The CS Councils embody the philosophy of collaborative governance in that responsibility for oversight of Clinical Services initiatives is shared equally among the disciplines that comprise the disciplines. The council model also serves to standardize the structure of the work groups at the unit/discipline level, to ensure consistent participation as well as encourage active involvement from areas that are sometimes underrepresented in hospital decision-making.
 

In January 2009, CS members and leaders determined the time was appropriate to review, evaluate, and modify the current state of committee, council and collaborative work efforts. Since the adoption and implementation of the Collaborative Governance model in September 2010, this model has supported the staff at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles to achieve many significant accomplishments. 

Recognizing an outstanding strength in nursing practice, we also acknowledged that all disciplines contributed to innovation, improvements and knowledge toward the achievement of the empirical high-quality outcomes that we all strived for in delivering patient care.  It takes all disciplines, working together as a team, to provide the best, well rounded care for our patients and families.  In recognition of these factors, we moved forward with the design and implementation of a pioneering Collaborative Governance structure, which integrated the knowledge, experience and voices of all our professional disciplines to achieve a working model of collaborative decision-making. 
 
Our model focuses on supporting and enhancing the ability of the caregivers to influence, contribute to, and determine the direction of their clinical practice. Not only has it empowered the staff to be the voice of their professions but it also has increased their cohesiveness and teamwork to levels we have not previously experienced. The model further supports the pursuit of knowledge and skill development as building blocks for integrating existing evidence-based practices and identifying new evidence for improved practice, along with the analysis and evaluation of outcomes. Our structure recognizes the inherent values of the organization, the value of our staff as experts in their professional fields and the contributions they provide in achieving excellence in health care. While we honor the past in focusing on nursing, we are creating the future by moving this focus to encompass all the voices of our multidisciplinary staff.
 

The Children’s Hospital Los Angeles Collaborative Governance structure is a councilor model. It consists of five core councils (Clinical Practice Council, Education and Professional Development Council, Quality Council, Recruitment and Retention Council, and Research Council) along with two coordinating councils - the bi-annual Collaborative Governance Forum and the Administrative Council. 

Clinical Practice Council

Functions with the authority to make recommendations and decisions in relation to discipline specific and interdisciplinary clinical practice standards.

Education and Professional Development Council

Functions with the authority to make recommendations and decisions in relation to CS educational and professional development initiatives.

Quality Council

Functions with the authority to make recommendations and decisions in relation to the quality and safety of care provided to patients and families.

Recruitment and Retention Council

Functions with the authority to make recommendations and decisions on initiatives for the ongoing recruitment and retention of CS staff.

Research Council

Functions with the authority to guide and support CS research and the use of Evidence-Based Practice at CHLA. 

Collaborative Governance Forum

Functions with the authority to make recommendations and decisions in relation to the oversight of CS clinical, research, educational, quality and recruitment and retention programs, systems and initiatives.

Administrative Council

Functions to facilitate agenda items/issues between councils and to facilitate any issues that require attention or decision making between established council meetings.
 

Magnet Recognition Program®

We are honored to have achieved Magnet® recognition from the American Nurses Credentialing Center for our compassionate approach to bedside care. CHLA is one of the few hospitals to approach Magnet Recognition® and our collaborative governance model through a multidisciplinary approach.

  • Magnet Initiative: Flexible scheduling
  • Magnet Initiative: Collaborative governance
  • Magnet Initiative: Research

The schedulers provide a blank schedule for each nurse to complete.

The schedule is collected four weeks before it is due to begin scheduling, and filled according to our unit’s scheduling guidelines.

Each staff member is responsible for filling the appropriate weekend obligations, approved vacation requests, education hours and meeting hours. Nurses are able to request time off up to six months in advance, allowing them to plan days off and vacations ahead of time.

Depending on the unit's established governance, staff members or a committee develops and facilitates the scheduling process with manager oversight.

We have strong, active unit-based committees that direct and provide education, training and guidance for preceptors, as well as boost and support social activities and morale.

Leaders of unit-based committees are asked to serve on the hospital's house-wide patient care services councils. This committee-council structure keeps our bedside staff nurses involved in governing and running hospital affairs. It also allows for information flow from the bedside to the councils and back.

Nurses participate in a number of nursing and physician-led research projects.

Many of our research projects are done in collaboration with the Children's Hospital Association and the National Institutes of Health.

Benefits for Nurses

Experienced Registered Nurses who work at the bedside are critical to accomplishing our core patient care mission. 

At Children's Hospital Los Angeles, we value our competitive position in the nursing marketplace for any number of reasons, including being able to recruit and retain the very best pediatric nurses. Along with our employee benefits package, we offer several programs designed to retain the most qualified nursing staff in the region and nation to join our team. 

In addition, we offer a wide range of incentives and flexible shifts designed to assist our RNs in meeting their personal needs.

  • Market Adjustments
  • Award-Winning Child Care
  • DAISY Hospital Designation
  • Nursing Professional Ladder
  • Nursing Differentials
  • Alternative Scheduling

Since 1996, Children's Hospital has conducted many vast market surveys, and made commensurate salary market adjustments, to keep its nursing salaries competitive with comparable institutions in Southern California.

Currently, we conduct our salary surveys on a bi-annual basis with our most recent market adjustment being made in 2011.

Our award-winning, on-campus Child Development Center (CDC) provides child care for our nurses and other employees. Services are provided 6:30 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., seven days a week and include:

  • Infant care
  • Pre-school
  • Kindergarten care
  • A “Get Well Room” for mildly sick children

The CDC also provides annual dental, vision and hearing assessments.

NOTE: Childcare is based on models designed by developmental psychologists Jean Piaget and Erik Erikson.

 

We are designated as a DAISY hospital to honor the “skillful and amazingly compassionate care” provided by its nurses. The hospital presents a DAISY Award to a nurse every month. 

Children's Hospital Los Angeles offers an extended five-level professional ladder for our nurses, making it possible for our new graduate nurses to provide ever better care for sick and injured children at our hospital. 

Standard Professional Growth

Standard professional growth for nurses at our hospital include:

  1. Entering the RN Residency Program
  2. Promoting to Registered Nurse I (22 weeks)
  3. Promoting to a Registered Nurse II (at one-year anniversary)
  4. After gaining more competencies and experience, applying to become a Registered Nurse III
  5. Being able to apply to become a Registered Nurse IV¹

Each promotion provides the opportunity for pay increases.

  • Promotion to RN III = 7 percent
  • Promotion to RN IV¹ = 7 percent

¹ The Registered Nurse IV promotion level was established in 2001; eight nurses at our hospital have achieved this elite position, which, in addition to competencies and experience, also requires nurses to participate in outside professional activities that might include writing and publishing articles in professional journals or speaking at national conferences and meetings.

 

Children's Hospital Los Angeles offers generous differentials for all levels of nursing practice.

Bachelor’s Degree and Master’s Degree Differential

The hospital offers a differential for RNs with the BSN degree and an additional differential for those with the MSN degree.

Charge Nurse Differential

RNs receive a differential for all hours worked as the Charge Nurse.

Clinical Preceptor Differential

RNs who agree to orient new direct care providers will receive a differential for time spent in that role.

Clinical Specialty Certification Differential

RNs and RCPs will be paid a Clinical Specialty Certification Differential for clinical specialty certifications. This differential is available to all RNs and RCPs who have an unexpired approved professional clinical specialty certification.

NOTE: Children's Hospital Los Angeles reimburses its nurses for the cost of a professional certification examination when it is successfully passed.

ECMO Nurse Differential

ECMO RNs will receive a differential for all hours worked while caring for an ECMO patient.

NOTE: This differential is available to RNs with current ECMO pump certification.

Float Team Differential

RNs who can float to only "Tier 1" floating area (Medical/Surgical or ICU) will receive a Float Team Differential for all paid hours; RNs who are competent to care for all types of patients in "Tier 2" floating areas (Medical/Surgical and UCU) will receive a higher salary differential. This differential is available for full- and part-time RNs who work in the Float Pool.

Night Shift Differential

We offer a generous night shift differential; that is, RNs will receive a differential of 10 percent of the base for the first four hours worked and 20 percent of the base for the last four hours worked, plus time-and-a-half.

Weekend Differential

We offer an hourly weekend differential for RNs that work “…rotating…” weekend shifts.

Alternate Full-Time Program

An Alternate Full-Time position allows nurses to work six shifts of 12 hours per pay period and still receive the same benefits, and benefit costs, as full-time employees. PTO and sick leave are accrued based on the actual hours worked up to established full-time accrual limits.

Self Scheduling

We place a high value on providing flexibility for our nurses so they can work around child care commitments and continuing education. RNs at every level of our hospital may request specific work schedules; that is, when they want to work and when they want time off. Self Scheduling Committees offer counsel to maintain fairness in the system.

NOTE: Nurses in the Center for Newborn and Infant Critical Care work fixed schedules.

Staff-Managed Unit Committees

We encourage our RNs to be entrepreneurs by creating a climate for ongoing professional excellence and job satisfaction. Unit level nurses have created:

  • Mock Code Task Forces
  • Staff Retention and Recruitment Committees
  • Staff Development Committees
  • Patient-Family Education Committees
  • Documentation Committees

EEO Minorities/Women/Disabled/Veterans

Nurse Education Program

Our commitment to care begins with our commitment to supporting our nurses' career goals. We are the founding hospital for the Versant RN Residency Program, now implemented across the nation to improve nurse education.

Training and Mentorship Opportunities

  • A new registered nurse (RN) graduate goes through a 22-week residency program and is precepted one-to-one by an experienced RN for the duration of the program.
  • New hire experienced RNs are also precepted for six weeks and mentored for the duration of their probationary period
  • Nurses' Education Levels by Percentage
  • Tuition Assistance and Education Allowance
  • Onsite Continuing Education Classes and Courses
  • Certification/Credentialing Test Fee Reimbursement
  • Register for a Nursing Education Course
  • Versant RN Residency Program
  • Diploma 6.5%
  • Associate 28.4%
  • Bachelor 52.7%
  • Master 11.9%
  • Doctorate 0.4%

 

Once a nurse has completed one year of employment, full-time RNs will be reimbursed 75percent of tuition expenses, up to $300 per quarter, for coursework taken that is directly related to their position or to a position that the employee could progress to within the hospital. 

Full-time RNs and LVNs are eligible for an annual $250 education allowance; part-time RNs and LVNs are eligible for an annual $125 education allowance. We also offer 16 hours per year in education time for all full-time RNs and LVNs; eight hours per year for part-time RNs and LVNs.

Our hospital offers more than 100 onsite continuing education, certification and re-certification classes for its nurses every year -- more than any other hospital in the area. Onsite certification classes are offered for:

  • ACLS
  • BSL Instructor
  • Chemo
  • ENPC
  • NRP
  • PALS
  • PALS Instructor
  • TNCC

Nurses and other health care professionals at our hospital, and those who support them, as well as health care professionals in the Greater Los Angeles area are invited to attend continuing education courses at our hospital.

NOTE: Children's Hospital Los Angeles has been granted approval from the Board of Registered Nursing (Provider Number CEP 183) to provide continuing education contact hours for registered nurses, and from the Board of Behavioral Sciences (Provider Number PCE 570) to offer contact hours for licensed social workers.

NOTE: We reimburse our nurses for the cost of relevant professional certification exams (e.g., CCRN, CPON, RN-C, etc.) when they are successfully passed; we offer a differential for nurses that have one or more of these professional certifications.

The USC Executive Master of Health Administration (MHA) degree program is conveniently scheduled for working clinical and management professionals concerned with advancing or transitioning their careers. The unique curriculum addresses competencies in such areas as finance, management and leadership, policy, strategy, operations, economics, managed care, health law and information systems.

For more information, email Lois Green at GreenL@usc.edu

By Phone

1.  Select your course
2.  Have your credit card in hand.
3.  Call 323-361-5962 to register.

By Regular Mail

1.  Download the Registration Form
2.  Complete the form.
3. Mail the form with your check or your credit card information to:

Attn: Lillian Hernandez
Education Coordinator
Children's Hospital Los Angeles
4650 Sunset Blvd., MS #74
Los Angeles, CA  90027

In Person

1. Go to the Patient Care Services
Education Office.

Location
McAllister Building, 4th Floor
Near Tiger Elevators, Room 4-56

Office Hours
Mon - Fri: 8:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Closed holidays

By Fax

1. Download the Registration Form
2. Complete the form and fax it to:
323-361-8587
Attn: Lillian Hernandez

Method of Payment

Check

Unless otherwise noted in the "Special Instructions" section of the course description, all checks should be made payable to Children's Hospital Los Angeles.  There will be a $15.00 charge for any returned checks.

Credit Card

We accept: Visa, MasterCard, American Express and Discover cards.

Payroll Deduction

Available for Children's Hospital Los Angeles employees only.  Contact your manager if you are eligible for education funding through Payroll Deduction.

Additional Payment Details

Registration and Payment must be received a minimum of 15 days prior to courses that require materials or textbooks to be mailed to course registrant prior to the class. In cases where courses are offered at no charge for employees of Children's Hospital Los Angeles, a $20 refundable deposit is required. Refundable reservation deposits will be returned upon class attendance.

NOTE:  Classrooms may become cool at times due to variable temperature.  Please bring a sweater or light-weight jacket with you to class.

At Children's Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA), it is our goal to take care of acutely ill and injured children in today’s increasingly complex technological environment. New graduate nurses need extended clinical experiences with appropriate support systems for a successful transition from nursing student to professional nurse.

At CHLA, we understand the needs of new graduate nurses as they integrate into the profession. To meet those needs, we use the Versant RN Residency in Pediatrics program, which provides the specific tools and experiences needed by new graduates to become successful pediatric nurses.

CHLA is the founding hospital of the Versant RN Residency. Created in July 1999, the 22-week program provides new nursing school graduates with a comprehensive clinical and learning experience to prepare them for work in an acute care environment. It has become the national model for new graduate nurse residency programs throughout the United States.

Learn more about our RN Residency Program.