• Summary
  • Research

Research Topics

Biophotonics

Collaborations

Dr. Allan Barbour, Director, NIH/NIAID Pacific Southwest Regional Center of Excellence (Region IX: California, Nevada, Arizona and Hawaii) for Biodefense. University of California at Irvine, Irvine, California. Dr. Bruce Tromberg, Director, Multidisciplinary Network for Translational Research in Optical Imaging (NIH: NTROI) at the Beckman Laser Institute, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, California. Dr. Laura Marcu, Director Biophotonics Laboratory, Department of Bioengineering, University of California at Davis. Davis, California. Dr. Gamani Karunasiri, Department of Physics, Navel Research Labs (NPS Monterey), Monterey, California.

National Presentations

Vishal Saxena, A Multimodal Non-invasive, in vivo Technique for Monitoring Vascular Status of Tumors, BIOMED 2008, St. Petersburg, Florida, USA, March 16-19, 2008.

Vishal Saxena, A Multimodal Non-invasive Technique for Monitoring Physical Fatigue, Optical Society of America (OSA) BIOMED 2008, St. Petersburg, Florida, USA, March 16-19, 2008. Vishal Saxena, Laura Marcu, Thanassis Papaioannou and Gamani Karunasiri, An All Optical Approach for Monitoring Physical Fatigue, Bios: Photonics West, January 22-26 2007.

Vishal Saxea, Jon Nielsen, Vazgen Khangaldyyan, Marvin Nelson, & Walter Laug, A Novel Integrated Photonic System for DOT/MR Imaging, Network for Translational Research in Optical Imaging (NTROI 2006) Retreat at the University of California, Irvine, June 22-24, 2006.

Vishal Saxena, Jon Nielsen and Walter Laug, A Non-invasive, Multi-modality Approach Based on NIRS and MRI Techniques For Monitoring Intra-Cranial Brain Tumor Angiogenesis Applied Imagery Pattern Recognition (AIPR) Workshop, Emerging Technologies and Applications for Imagery Pattern Recognition, sponsored by IEEE, SPIE, APS/OSA, and DHS, Washington DC, October 19-21, 2005.

Vishal Saxena, Jon F. Nielsen, Ignacio Gonzales, Karapetyan Gevorg, Khangaldyyan Vazgen, and Walter Laug, A Non-invasive, Multi-modality Approach for Monitoring Brain Tumor (Glioblastoma) Angiogenesis in a Small Animal Model, Network for Translational Research in Optical Imaging (NTROI 2005 Retreat) at the University of California, Irvine, June 2-4 2005.

V. Saxena, Improved Optical Imaging and Spectroscopy Employing Integrated Photonic Technology, Fourth Inter-Institute Workshop on Optical Diagnostic Imaging from Bench to Bedside held at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Washington, DC, 20-22 September 2004. Generation of an Ultra Wide Band Arbitrary Waveform for Bio-Medical Imaging, Third Inter-institute Workshop on Diagnostic Imaging and Spectroscopy, Sponsored by NIH, SPIE, OSA and Industrial Partners, Sep. 26-27, 2002.

International Presentations

Vishal Saxena & Walter Laug, A Novel Approach for Monitoring Tumor Vascularization, Number: 08-A-317-SMI. World Molecular Imaging Congress, Nice France, Sep. 10-13, 2008-08-25

Vishal Saxena, Optical Check-up of Brain Tumors: A Non-invasive, in vivo Technique for Monitoring Vascular Status of Brain Tumor (Glioblastoma) during Angiogenesis, Raja Raman Center for Advance Technology, Indore, India (Host: Dr. P K Gupta), August 29, 2008.

Vishal Saxena, A Non-invasive multimodal technique to monitor brain tumor vascularization, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology-Kanpur (IIT-K), India, (Host: Dr. R Prasad), April 24, 2007

Vishal Saxena, J. F. Nielsen and M.D. Nelson, Time Stretching of Fluorescence Signal for Time and Frequency Domain Measurements, EBO03 European Conference on Biomedical Optics 2003, Munich, Germany, 22-25 June 2003.

Education

Fellowship: 

Fellow of Cambridge Philosophical Society, since 1997.

Accomplishments

Awards: 

Wright Foundation Award 2007

Research Interests: 

Application of physics and engineering in life science My research activity is concentrated in the development and application of novel optical devices and systems for non-invasive in vivo monitoring of patho-physiological processes in tissues and cell. The experimental techniques involve the combination of laser micro-irradiation technologies, including continuous wave and time domain “Diffuse Optical Tomography” (DOT), Fluorescence Optical Tomography (FOT) and Raman scattering techniques along with biophysical models and construction of “instrumentation and devices” for non-invasive imaging of physiological parameters such as hemoglobin oxygenation, tissue water content, fat content, and relative blood volume. On multimodal cancer imaging front, I have developed non-invasive, in-vivo technologies (combination of near infrared spectroscopy: NIRS and Magnetic Resonance Imaging: MRI) for the investigation of breast & brain (glioblastoma) tumors. The technique involves extraction of concentration of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin and water within tumor vasculature at 15 discrete wavelengths in a spectral window of 650-980 nm. The information obtained from NIRS, MRI and conventional histopathology (H&E method) reveals a direct correlation between tumor size, intratumoral microvessel density (MVD) and tumor oxygenation. The relative decrease in oxygen saturation value with tumor growth indicates that though blood vessels infiltrate and proliferate the tumor region, a hypoxic trend seems to be clearly present. The research work is quoted as the very first successful pre-clinical measurement of intracrainal brain tumor vascularization (“An optical check-up for brain tumours” at Medical Physics Web: medicalphysicsweb.org/cws/article/research/32616).

My other research interest includes, development of noninvasive all optical technology to monitor physiology of an exercising muscle. Under this initiative I have developed an all optical system based on near infrared spectroscopy and mid infrared imaging as a non-invasive, in-vivo tool to monitor vascular status of skeletal muscle and the physiological changes that occur during exercise. A near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technique, namely: Steady State Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy (SSDOS) along with mid infrared imaging (MIRI) is applied for monitoring the changes in the values of tissue oxygenation and thermometry of an exercising muscle. The NIRS measurements are performed at five discrete wavelengths in a spectral window of 650-850 nm and MIRI is performed in a spectral window of 8-12m. The understanding of tissue oxygenation status and the behavior of the physiological parameters derived from thermometry may provide useful insight into muscle physiology, therapeutic response and treatment. Moreover, such multimodal technique may also be applied to study chronic forearm pain, detection of carpal tunnel syndrome, upper extremity musculoskeletal disorder and other compressive neuropathies.