Co-director, Translational Biomedical Imaging Laboratory, Saban Research Institute; Provost Professor of Biological Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, USC
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Scott E. Fraser, PhD has a long-standing commitment to quantitative biology, applying the tools of chemistry, engineering, and physics to problems in biology and medicine. His personal research centers on imaging and molecular analyses of intact biological systems, with an emphasis on early development, organogenesis, and medical diagnostics.

After training in physics (BS, Harvey Mudd College, 1976) and biophysics (PhD, Johns Hopkins University, 1979), he joined the faculty at UC Irvine, and rose through the ranks to become Chair of the Department of Physiology and Biophysics. In 1990 he moved to Caltech to serve as the Anna L. Rosen Professor of Biology, and the Director of the Biological Imaging Center.

He is deeply committed to interdisciplinary training and translational research, having helped found the Caltech Brain Imaging Center and the Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, as well as serving as the Director of the Rosen Center for Biological Engineering.

In Fall 2012, he moved to USC to take a Provost Professorship in the Dornsife College of Letters Arts and Sciences, the Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Keck School of Medicine and the Viterbi School of Engineering. He remains active in interdisciplinary research and serves as the Director of Science Initiatives for the USC campuses.

Education

Medical School: 

Johns Hopkins University, PhD (Biophysics); Harvey Mudd College, BS (Physics)

Publications: 

Abundance of gap junctions at glutamatergic mixed synapses in adult Mosquitofish spinal cord neurons.Serrano-Velez JL, Rodriguez-Alvarado M, Torres-Vazquez II, Fraser SE, Yasumura T, Vanderpool KG, Rash JE, Rosa-Molinar E. Front Neural Circuits. 2014 Jun 26;8:66. doi: 10.3389/fncir.2014.00066. eCollection 2014.

The herpes virus Fc receptor gE-gI mediates antibody bipolar bridging to clear viral antigens from the cell surface. Ndjamen B, Farley AH, Lee T, Fraser SE, Bjorkman PJ. PLoS Pathog. 2014 Mar 6;10(3):e1003961. doi: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1003961. eCollection 2014 Mar.

Efficient generation of transgenic mice by lentivirus-mediated modification of spermatozoa. Chandrashekran A, Sarkar R, Thrasher A, Fraser SE, Dibb N, Casimir C, Winston R, Readhead C. FASEB J. 2014 Feb;28(2):569-76. doi: 10.1096/fj.13-233999. Epub 2013 Dec 2.

Patients' perceptions of their general practitioner's health and weight influences their perceptions of nutrition and exercise advice received. Fraser SE, Leveritt MD, Ball LE. J Prim Health Care. 2013 Dec 1;5(4):301-7.

Phase-variance optical coherence tomography: a technique for noninvasive angiography.
Schwartz DM, Fingler J, Kim DY, Zawadzki RJ, Morse LS, Park SS, Fraser SE, Werner JS. Ophthalmology. 2014 Jan;121(1):180-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ophtha.2013.09.002. Epub 2013 Oct 21. 

Research Interests: 

Research Topics

  • Quantitative biology
  • Applying the tools of chemistry, engineering, and physics to problems in biology and medicine
  • Imaging and molecular analyses of intact biological systems, with an emphasis on early development, organogenesis, and medical diagnostics


Research Overview

Scott E. Fraser, PhD has a long-standing commitment to quantitative biology, applying the tools of chemistry, engineering, and physics to problems in biology and medicine. His personal research centers on imaging and molecular analyses of intact biological systems, with an emphasis on early development, organogenesis, and medical diagnostics.

Using imaging technologies to observe the natural course of biology in action, within living organisms will help accelerate development of new diagnostics and treatments.

Bioimaging includes powerful, innovative tools for the study of biological processes—such as confocal microscopes that can image virtually any specimen on a slide or culture dish, live-cell imaging and in-vivo fluorescence imaging. Additionally, confocal laser scanning microscopy allows investigators to acquire in-focus images from selected depths, a process known as optical sectioning. Images are then acquired point by point and reconstructed with a computer, allowing three-dimensional reconstructions of topologically complex structures. All of these methods hold enormous potential for a wide variety of diagnostic and therapeutic applications.


Glomerulus
Many axons forming a glomerulus in a mouse olfactory bulb.

 

 

 

 


Seminiferous Tubule
Confocal live image of a P0 (day of birth testis) seminiferous tubule.

 

 

 

 


Flip Trap
3D projection of a confocal image of a zebrafish heart at 28 hpf.

 

 

 

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