All CHLA Blog Posts

Published on March 2, 2015
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Dehydration, abdominal pain and diarrhea are all common symptoms of colitis—a disease caused by inflammation of the large intestine’s lining. But most people don’t know that, in addition to these uncomfortable gastrointestinal issues, colitis can also lead to an increased risk... Read More
Published on March 2, 2015
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Michael Neely, MD, a pediatric infectious diseases specialist at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, helps explain the facts about measles, how parents can prevent further outbreak, and what CHLA can do to help prevent infection and to treat those who have already been infected.How... Read More
Published on February 26, 2015
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“Bays of Our Lives” is a series that goes behind the laboratory bench (also called a “bay”) to highlight the individual personalities behind innovative research at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA). I recently caught up with Philip Dubé, PhD, a gastroenterology researcher... Read More
Published on February 24, 2015
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researchchla: “Friend or Foe? E.coli K1 interaction with macrophages” Credit: Prasadarao Nemani, PhD, from The Saban Research Institute of Children’s Hospital Los Angeles Immune cells, such as macrophages, play a critical role in killing bacteria and clearing the body of... Read More
Published on February 23, 2015
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More than 30 surgeries to correct his chest, rib and spinal abnormalities have not been able to diminish the courage of Alex Ito. An uneventful pregnancy left Wendy and John Ito blindsided by what ensued after Wendy gave birth in July 1999: Their new son, Alex, was diagnosed... Read More
Published on February 20, 2015
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PTSD. Four letters we immediately associate with soldiers and horrific wartime tragedies. But unfortunately, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can affect anyone who has experienced a traumatic event—including children with serious medical diagnoses. Called medical PTSD, this... Read More
Published on February 19, 2015
I love this question that people say to me: Why did you want to become a scientist? I have to refrain myself from saying ‘Well, why don’t you?’
Published on February 16, 2015
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From regulating our metabolism and mood to influencing overall growth and development, hormones intimately govern how our body works—especially during childhood and adolescence. But for youth with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), infections and HIV-fighting antiretroviral... Read More
Published on February 12, 2015
To all the MDs and PhDs who are reading this, I’m extending a challenge to you: Take the time to share what you know, and to be a role model for younger generations. The future of science and medicine depends upon it.
Published on February 12, 2015
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On Valentine’s Day, most people receive cards immersed in proclamations of love and red or pink symbols of the heart. But what if you received a card with a picture of a ventricular assist device (VAD)? Many of you might be confused. But to a select few, this is a proclamation... Read More
Published on February 9, 2015
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Deep within the brain’s hypothalamus, there is a collection of neurons that serve as the central regulators of appetite, metabolism and fat storage. Called the arcuate nucleus, these neurons respond to circulating hunger and satiety signals in blood, increasing or decreasing our... Read More
Published on February 6, 2015
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The kids at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles experienced a fun-filled event when Yoobi + Starlight Children’s Foundation brought out Yoobi’s colorful school supplies, American model, Molly Sims, and TV host and personality, Stacy Keibler. Tables were set up with bright and fun... Read More
Published on February 5, 2015
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Did you know that children who are obese when they’re diagnosed with leukemia are more likely to relapse after chemotherapy? In fact, there’s a 50% higher chance that the cancer will return in these patients when compared to their lean counterparts.Researchers from Children’s... Read More
Published on February 5, 2015
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Dylan, who often makes LEGO gifts for those he becomes close with, made Pau a new LEGO creation   Pau Gasol returned last week to the Staples Center in a Chicago Bulls uniform to take on his former team, the Los Angeles Lakers. But, hours after his plane landed, he made time... Read More
Published on February 2, 2015
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As you can see above, crescent-shaped red blood cells have a hard time making their way through the blood vessels of individuals with sickle cell disease (SCD). These roadblocks in cellular travel can cause serious pain, prevent oxygen and nutrients from reaching tissues and... Read More
Published on January 28, 2015
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Three-dimensional printing technology can make surgery safer for children with congenital heart disease and reduce the duration, as well as the number of invasive procedures, required. Richard Kim, MD, a cardiac surgeon at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA), recently used a... Read More
Published on January 26, 2015
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Accounting for about one quarter of all childhood cancer diagnoses, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is one of the most common malignancies affecting kids under the age of 15. In the past, ALL had a high mortality rate; nearly 80 percent of the children with the disease did... Read More
Published on January 22, 2015
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Like the sad tale of an aging superhero, mice are able to regenerate their hearts after birth, but rapidly lose this ability by the time they are one week old. Investigators at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) recently looked into the regenerative mechanisms of this brief... Read More
Published on January 20, 2015
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Our motivation to eat can be influenced by any number of sources—a friend’s decadent Instagram post, a new restaurant review that has you drooling, or simply the urge stave off boredom on a Wednesday night. But despite all of these external cues, our biological motivation to... Read More
Published on January 16, 2015
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Simulating a Connection Macrophages, one type of our body’s immune cells, have the crucial job of identifying and destroying harmful invaders to keep us disease-free. Usually, the macrophages employ a specialized receptor to detect pathogens that are coated with antibodies. This... Read More

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