• Summary
  • Publications
  • Research
  • Media
  • Locations

 

Lily Chao, MD, MS examines how changes in metabolism affect muscle performance. Muscle metabolism and function are important in diabetes and many other diseases. For example, skeletal muscle not only informs locomotive function, but also has an indispensable role in systemic energy homeostasis -- or the ability to sustain the stability of internal functions.  And while exercises that increase muscle mass can improve glycemic control in type 2 diabetes subjects, muscle atrophy is associated with impaired glucose metabolism.  Understanding the molecular switches that control nutrient metabolism and muscle mass may have broad implications for patients with muscle atrophy stemming from a wide range of conditions including diabetes, neuromuscular diseases, spinal cord injury, chronic glucocorticoid exposure, aging, and cancer.

Education

Medical School: 

University of California, Los Angeles (MD), University of California, Los Angeles (MS, Biochemistry)

Internship: 

University of California, Los Angeles, Mattel Children’s Hospital (Pediatrics)

Residency: 

University of California, Los Angeles, Mattel Children’s Hospital (Pediatrics)

Fellowship: 

University of Southern California, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (Pediatric Endocrinology)

Accomplishments

Certification: 

American Board of Pediatrics: General Pediatrics

Medical Awards: 

Pasadena Magazine’s Top Doctors 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Endocrine Society Early Investigator Award, 2014

Clinical Research Scholar, Pediatric Endocrine Society, 2013

Junior Faculty Developmental Award, UCSD/UCLA Diabetes and Endocrinology Research Center, 2011

Fellow’s Basic Research Award, Society of Pediatric Research, 2007

Research Scholar, Howard Hughes Medical Institute-National Institutes of Health, 1999-2000

Publications: 

Goddard LM, Murphy TJ, Org T, Enciso JM, Hashimoto-Partyka MK, Warren CM, Domigan CK, McDonald AI, He H, Sanchez LA, Allen NC, Orsenigo F, CHAO LC, Dejana E, Tontonoz P, Mikkola HK, Iruela-Arispe ML.  Progesterone receptor in the vascular endothelium triggers physiological uterine permeability preimplantation. Cell  2014;156:549-562.

Tessem JS, Moss LG, CHAO LC, Arlottoa M, Lu D, Jensen MV, Stephens SB, Tontonoz P, Hohmeier HE, Newgard CB. Nkx6.1 regulates islet beta-cell proliferation via Nr4a1 and Nr4a3 nuclear receptors.  PNAS  2014;111:5242-5247.

Sallam T, Ito A, Rong X, Kim J, Van Stijn C, Chamberlain BT, Jung M, CHAO LC, Jones M, Gilliland T, Wu X, Su G, Tangirala RK, Tontonoz P and Hong C.  Macrophage lipopolysaccharide binding protein gene is an LXR target that promotes macrophage survival and atherosclerosis.  J Lipid Res  2014;55:1120-1130.

Research Interests: 

Lily Chao, MD, and her team are interested in understanding the physiological pathways that coordinate muscle metabolism and growth with the aim of developing new therapeutics to improve glycemic control and prevent muscle atrophy.

Research Topics

  • Muscle metabolism
  • Nuclear receptor signaling
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Insulin signaling in muscle tissue

Research Overview

Muscle atrophy stemming from disuse, chronic inflammation, cancer, and long-term nutrient deprivation leads to functional decline and metabolic imbalance. Identification of regulatory factors that can augment muscle size may have clinical implications for treatment of sarcopenia -- the degenerative loss of skeletal muscle mass.

Lily Chao, MD, examines how changes in metabolism affect muscle performance. Muscle metabolism and function are important in diabetes and many other diseases. For example, skeletal muscle not only informs locomotive function, but also has an indispensable role in systemic energy homeostasis -- or the ability to sustain the stability of internal functions.  And while exercises that increase muscle mass can improve glycemic control in type 2 diabetes subjects, muscle atrophy is associated with impaired glucose metabolism.  Understanding the molecular switches that control nutrient metabolism and muscle mass may have broad implications for patients with muscle atrophy stemming from a wide range of conditions including diabetes, neuromuscular diseases, spinal cord injury, chronic glucocorticoid exposure, aging, and cancer.  

Researchers at the Chao lab are studying the fundamental mechanisms that promote muscle growth. Understanding the physiological pathways that coordinate muscle metabolism and growth will serve as a portal toward the development of therapeutics to improve glycemic control and prevent muscle atrophy.

4650 Sunset Blvd.
MS #61
Los Angeles, CA 90027
Phone: 323-361-4606Office